Registrations have closed.
Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

by IMPRI
2113 2113 people viewed this event.

The State of Cities- #CityConversations with Dr Ashima Sood on Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

Greetings from Impact and Policy Research Institute (IMPRI), New Delhi!
On behalf of Center for Habitat, Urban and Regional Studies (CHURS), IMPRI, New Delhi and Indrastra Global invite you to

The State of Cities – #CityConversations

Details of the #WebPolicyTalk:
Date: December 22, 2020; Tuesday
Time: 17:00 IST (GMT+5:30)
Platform: Zoom and Facebook Live

Speaker:
Ashima Sood
Dr Ashima Sood, Associate Professor, Anant National University, Gujarat

Ashima Sood is Associate Professor at Anant National University, where she teaches urban policy, research methods and academic writing. She is International Corresponding Editor at Urban Studies and has been associated as editor and editorial advisory group member with the Economic and Political Weekly’s Review of Urban Affairs since its founding. She coordinated the Urban Transformations curriculum for EPG-Pathshala, an initiative of the Indian Ministry of Education to create postgraduate curricula across the disciplines. She also contributed the section on Indian Urbanization to the Oxford Bibliographies on Urban Studies.

Her research lies at the intersection of institutional economics and urban and development studies. It combines qualitative and quantitative methodologies to examine privatized forms of urban governance and informal public spaces in India. A co-edited volume titled India’s Greenfield Urban Future: The Politics of Land, Planning and Infrastructure is forthcoming at Orient Blackswan. She is working on a monograph titled Capital Citizens, analysing models of private local government in Indian growth hubs.

Her work has received funding and/or fellowships from the Urban Studies Foundation, the India Foundation of the Arts, the Azim Premji University Foundation, the Indian Institute of Advanced Study and the Centre de Sciences Humaines. Her research has been published or is forthcoming in avenues such as Urban Studies; CitiesTerritory, Politics, GovernanceInformation, Communication and Society; Journal of Institutional Economics; the Economic and Political Weekly; tthe Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Urban and Regional Research and the World Social Science Report 2013, among others. She earned her PhD in Economics from Cornell University.

Moderator:
Soumyadip Chattopadhyay
Dr Soumyadip Chattopadhyay, Associate Professor, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan; Senior Fellow, IMPRI

Registration and Facebook Live Link for Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

About the Talk

Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

Ashima Sood

The COVID lockdown of 2020 brought distressing images of migrant workers fleeing Indian cities to  return to their rural origins. While commentators sought to explain the reverse migration in terms of  the precarious urban living and working conditions of these migrants, or in terms of an atavistic  attachment to rural life, few analysts focused on the role played by governance institutions. Drawing  on recent research, this presentation makes the connection between the peri-urban and peri metropolitan location of new construction and economic activity and the often-unrepresentative nature of local government in these sites. Fragmented and specialized forms of government in settings  like Greater Hyderabad or Noida make it difficult for migrant workers to assert their right to the city.  The recent scenes of reverse migration thus represent the outcome of long-standing processes of  exclusionary urbanisation. Not only have the urban poor been pushed out of the core of our  megacities, the political economy of peri-urban settings in many cases may have rendered inoperative  modes of vote-bank politics that made possible occupancy politics.  

YouTube Video:

Facebook Live Video:



Event Report:

Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

Media Coverage:

Can the migrant be heard by our cities? Migration, Exclusionary Urbanisation and the Precarious State of Affairs

Podcasts:



Additional Details

Registration Deadline Time - 12:00 AM

Event registration closed.
 

Date And Time

22/12/2020 @ 05:00 PM to
22/12/2020 @ 06:30 PM
 

Registration End Date

22/12/2020
 

Location

Online event
 

Event Types

 

Event Category

 
Watch video
 

Share With Friends